Pressure and volume relationship water

Pressure, temperature, and volume relation in liquids | Physics Forums

pressure and volume relationship water

Gas molecules inside a volume (e.g. a balloon) are constantly moving around freely. The direction of this gas pressure force is always perpendicular to the surface If water were used instead of mercury, the height of the column equivalent to normal With density being the ratio of mass per volume, the gas density of the. The water velocity into a region with atmospheric pressure goes as the . A where Q is the volume flow, V is the velocity of the flow and A is the. Density is related to volume by the fact that density is defined as mass divided by volume: [math]\displaystyle \rho ={\frac {m}{V}}[/math] So a relationship between.

If we squeeze the balloon, we compress the air and two things will happen: Since density is mass over volume, and the mass stays constant, the rise in density means that the volume of the balloon decreases: For two states of pressure P1, P2 and two corresponding volumes V1, V2this is stated mathematically: This in turn increases the rate at which the gas molecules bombard the skin of the balloon.

Pressure, temperature, and volume relation in liquids

Cooling the balloon down again will make the balloon shrink. For two states with temperatures T1, T2 and two corresponding volumes V1, V2: We could think of a liquid under pressure like a gas under pressure which cannot change volume, due to its special container that doesn't let it change volume the liquid itself!

pressure and volume relationship water

Yes, but ideal liquids? As for solids - well supposedly the fairly solid "earth" is under pressure causing tremendous heat in the center - kind of empirical evidence that pressure causes heat in solids.

pressure and volume relationship water

So this might answer my question - but still! I have to ask about liquids specifically too.

pressure and volume relationship water

Or more pumps are added in series? I am also having trouble seeing how static water pressure can be increased without the pump turbine blades snapping in half due to the virtuallly incompressible water. I can visualize the dynamic pressure increasing once someone turns a tap on - but static pressure of liquids is a bit more tricky to visualize.

Can a pump simply "shudder" and basically stay static, but still waste energy performing molecular work - increasing static pressure but not moving the water as a whole.

Water's unexplained properties

Doesn't a pump motor have to move somewhat in order to perform work - but if the water cannot move.??? Densities of water tend towards a 6th power law dependent on temperature and pressure As this power law does not obey the rule of thumb that candidate power laws should exhibit an approximately linear relationship on a log-log plot over at least two orders of magnitude in both the x-axes and y-axes [ ], it seems likely that this relationship is purely empirical.

I am again grateful to Frank Grimer for pointing me at this relationship. Volume change increases as the square-root 3 power of the temperature The square-root 3 term is related to the Vesica Piscesbeing the ratio of the long to short diameter of intersecting expanded icosahedral water clusters the short diameter being the distance between the centers of neighboring dodecahedra and the long diameter associated with a plane of water molecules between the two pentameric boxes Figure 3h joining them.

Boyle's law

I am again grateful to Frank Grimer for showing me this relationship. Log10 T-T0 vs log viscosity data In the graph above, H2O values are shown by the green squares red lineand D2O values are indicated by the blue diamonds blue line.

pressure and volume relationship water

As this power law does not quite obey the rule of thumb that candidate power laws should exhibit an approximately linear relationship on a log-log plot over at least two orders of magnitude in both the x-axes and y-axes [ ], it seems possible that this relationship is curious but purely empirical.

This power law has recently been investigated using new viscosity data [ ].

Animation : Relationship of Pressure with Volume and Temperature